Using Strand Maps to Build Core Concepts


The strand maps presented on this page demonstrate how the North Carolina Science Essential Standards guide students’ thinking about core concepts in Science. They also show how students' ideas become increasingly sophisticated over time. The strand maps incorporate the research presented in A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas, the Benchmarks for Science Literacy and AAAS Atlas of Science Literacy Vols. I and II to scaffold the Science Essential Standards providing guidance for developing curricula.

These documents are intended to serve as examples and are not intended to be all inclusive of ways of sequencing the standards.
Professional Development is available to assist with using the strand maps to develop local curriculum.

















References:
1. American Association for the Advancement of Science. (1993). Benchmarks for Science Literacy. New York: Oxford University Press.
2. American Association for the Advancement of Science. (2001). Atlas of Science Literacy. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press.
3. Anderson, Lorin W. and David R. Krathwohl, 2001. A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, © Published by Allyn and Bacon, Boston, MA. © 2001 by Pearson Education.
4. Corcoran, Tom, Mosher, Frederic A. and Rogat, Aaron, (2009). Learning Progressions in Science_ An Evidence-based Approach to Reform. Philadelphia, PA.: Consortium for Policy Research in Education.
5. National Research Council. (2012). A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. Committee on a Conceptual Framework for New K-12 Science Education Standards. Board on Science Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.